Seniors Share Passion of Sports With Younger Students

Four seniors on the Eagles varsity baseball team came together off the diamond to make a difference for younger children by using their passion for sports.

David Ernst, Joey Greene, Ryan Peltier and Ben Thomas went to Our Lady of the Rosary school and shared with the students what it means to be a good teammate, as part of the seniors’ Capstone Project.

“Since I've played sports for such a long time I thought it'd be a good idea to share some of my skills with others or kids who never had the opportunity to play sports,” said Thomas.

Peltier added, “My love for sports made me interested in mentoring the youth and I felt it was good to give back, especially to young kids who need someone to look up to.”

The seniors went to Our Lady of the Rosary school throughout the school year and spoke with students in the second grade.

“On our first two visits we talked about what good sportsmanship is and what it means to be a team player,” said Ernst. “We worked on applying those skills into the games we played as well.”

“We have done tons of activities with them like basketball, soccer, kickball, and PACMAN,” Thomas emphasized.

The group reflected that they were surprised about the impact they made on the students.

“I didn't expect the kids to interact the way they did with us, but when we got there, we all
clicked together and had a lot of fun,” said Peltier. “The kids were excited to do activities like play basketball, kickball and soccer. We learned that a lot of young student athletes really look up to people our age.”

Ernst agreed, “We weren't sure if second graders were old enough to really understand the concepts but they did very well with them. They were able to understand them and apply them very well during competition.”

Thomas added, “Not only are these kids good at sports now, but they can also be a good sport and have fun while doing so.”
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“Focusing on a topic that our group enjoyed made it a great experience for us,” Ernst shared.

When reflecting on the project overall, Peltier said, “We didn't know how well it would go with second graders so we thought maybe the next time we went we could work with 5th or maybe 6th graders, but we really interacted with the kids well. They were sad when we had to leave and sent us thank you letters after our first visit saying, ‘Please come back soon,’ and, ‘Thank you for playing with us.’ We were all touched by this and visited the students earlier this month, and plan to go back again soon.”

Posted March 12, 2018